<html><head><style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;} --></style></head><body><div style="font-family:tahoma, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><DIV>Greetings to the group,&nbsp;Emailed&nbsp;Mark, After&nbsp;coming across his name on the net. He is scheduled to&nbsp;do a demo&nbsp;in&nbsp;Nebraska at a hamfest&nbsp;on Balloon launches. Just thought I would pass this along...Corey&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR></DIV>
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: tahoma, new york, times, serif; FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><BR>
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif; FONT-SIZE: 12pt">Hi Corey,<BR><BR>I agree it would be best to use APRS for your first flight.&nbsp; There are several lightweight packages out there that would fit within your weight budget.&nbsp; <BR><BR>If you use 144.39 MHz for one of your APRS packages, the regular network will pick it up to within a few thousand feet AGL.&nbsp; From those position reports and knowledge of what the winds are like, you can narrow your search radius if you're not close enough to hear it directly.&nbsp; With normal flights, we have had few issues with locating the payload even if we weren't close to it at landing.&nbsp; <BR><BR>A radar reflector is not worth the weight.&nbsp; A couple of groups have done experiments with reflectors while ATC tried to look for it.&nbsp; They could not see it even if they knew exactly where to look.&nbsp; Normal filtering algorithms in the radar data processing removes such
 slow-moving echoes - that all has to be turned off to even have a chance of spotting it.&nbsp; Routine aircraft tracking is done by active transponders.<BR><BR>What kind of balloon do you have?&nbsp; Most of the time they are sized by weight in grams.&nbsp; A 300-gram balloon will get you around 60,000-70,000 ft with a 3-lb payload.&nbsp; <BR><BR>You may want to read over FAR Part 101 for unmanned free balloon regulations.&nbsp; If you abide by certain weight, density, and load line strength limits, you're exempt from any reporting requirements.&nbsp; If you have contact with the FAA they will likely welcome your reports but they are not mandatory if you are exempt.&nbsp; NSTAR follows the exemption requirements and thus we have not done anything beyond file NOTAMs.&nbsp; If you go outside the exemption restrictions, you then have to get waivers which may involve real-time updates.<BR><BR>This is an online book by the guy who mentored me into the hobby
 and well worth reading:<BR>http://www.parallax.com/tabid/567/Default.aspx<BR><BR>Also, one of the most active groups has an extensive web site with loads of technical details on their payloads:<BR>http://www.eoss.org<BR><BR>I should have some time one evening later in the week if you want to talk by phone.&nbsp; I can let you know what evenings would work best in a day or two - this will give you a chance to look through the online stuff which should help you a lot.<BR><BR>73 de Mark N9XTN<BR><A href="http://www.nstar.org/" rel=nofollow target=_blank>www.nstar.org</A><BR><BR></DIV></DIV></div></body></html>